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Lemon Drop Cookies

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These are completely addictive! I found this cookie recipe in my Mixer Bible when I got my new Kitchen Aid. They are very soft and lemony and I love anything with lemon. They don’t last long when I do make them so I suppose they are a big hit with others as well. This recipe is just for lemon but I have made them with orange & grapefruit with just equal substitution, still great but lemon is by far my favourite! One thing I did change is that I put mine in a piping bag to get perfect round little cookies whereas wit a spoon drop they were a little messier looking. If you don’t have an icing bag use a ziplock bag with the corner trimmed off.

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Lemon Drop Cookies
super lemony, soft cookies
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Ingredients
  1. 3 cups all purpose flour
  2. 2 tsp baking powder
  3. 1 tsp salt
  4. 1 1/2 cups sugar
  5. 3/4 cup of unsalted butter
  6. 3 tbsp grated lemon zest
  7. 1/4 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
  8. 3 eggs
Glaze
  1. 2 cups icing sugar
  2. 1/4 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 375 F
  2. Line 2 cookie sheets with parchment paper.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder and salt.
  4. In a separate bowl (or mixer) cream sugar and butter together until light and fluffy. Beat in zest and juice and then the eggs one at a time. Reduce speed and add flour in three additions.
  5. Drop about a tablespoons worth on the cookie sheet a couple inches apart. Bake for about 8-10 minutes. They stay very light so don't look for browning. Let cool completely and then brush with glaze. The glaze is made just by mixing the icing sugar and lemon until smooth.
  6. Makes 5 dozen.
Notes
  1. These freeze really well and are actually really good to eat when they are frozen!
Adapted from The Mixer Bible
Adapted from The Mixer Bible
Tongue In Cheek http://tongueinyourcheek.com/
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Tracy - April 2, 2014 - 4:58 pm

How much butter?

viennahi - April 2, 2014 - 5:05 pm

thanks for pointing that out! I have fixed the error, its 3/4 of a cup.
Vienna

French Onion Soup

Retro-made-right this soup is. Using red or white wine and chicken stock rather than beef makes this soup lighter with greater depth of flavour than the traditional beef stock. Let’s be honest, the best part of French Onion soup is the bread and cheese grilled on top but this version is so tasty you wont even miss it if you opt for a lighter version still.

As usual, use homemade chicken stock whenever possible. It’s health and flavour benefits will not compare to anything you can buy. Homemade stock, however, is not always on hand I have recently discovered this particular brand (found at Safeway) which has a decent ingredients list, is gluten & msg free and has low sodium. It’s has a nice golden colour and tastes pretty good. Good enough to work with anyway.

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Take 5 large onions (Vidalla, or Myan Sweet are the best but yellow onions are good too) and slice them into half rounds. Using a mandolin is fast and even but a sharp knife works just as well.

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In a large pot, medium heat, add a couple tablespoons of olive oil, add the onions and a healthy pinch of sea salt. Let the onions sweat down slowly, stirring occasionally until they become soft and brown. This will take time, at least 45 minutes.

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When the onions are caramelized completely add a tablespoon of fresh thyme. Sprinkle a heaping spoonful of flour over the onions and stir to dissolve all the flour. This will thicken your broth slightly at the end, if you don’t want use flour skip this part and add a spoonful of cornstarch slurried into a couple tablespoons of cold water at the end instead or skip thickening all together.

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After your flour is dissolved, add about a 1/2 cup of red or white wine (I prefer red) and let cook for about a minute until the alcohol has cooked out. If you don’t have (or want) wine try a couple tablespoons of balsamic reduction or some red wine vinegar. Now add about a litre and a half of stock. Bring to a boil and reduce immediately to a barely there simmer for about 10-15 minutes. Check your seasoning, you probably need to add some salt and a splash or worcestershire.

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When your ready to eat, spoon into oven safe dishes and add some good quality toasted bread and cover with cheese and broil until golden and bubbly. My new favourite adaptation is to make croutons and put that on top rather than one piece of bread as it gets too hard to eat. Click here for my croutons.

Enjoy!

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Croutons

I hate croutons. They suck.

You can’t even stab them with your fork.

Have you ever cut the roof of your mouth on a crouton? I have. Many times.

Don’t be lazy and don’t waste your money, make your own it takes like 6 minutes.

There is always some bread left on the counter. Today it was one onion bagel left that has been sitting there for 3 days and the last 2 slices of multigrain bread that I know everyone has given up on. So chop ’em up. Add to a pan with a few tablespoons of olive oil and  some butter. Add the bread when it’s bubbling and don’t muck with it for a bit. Let it get toasty and then toss the pan and let sit some more. When they are close to done season with salt and whatever else you like. Add to your salad or soup. The beauty of these is that they are toasty on the outside and chewy on the inside. Plus, because you used whatever you have on hand you have a variety of textured and flavoured croutons, like onion, olive, cheese.

They are the bomb.  

croutons

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French Onion Soup » Tongue In Cheek - January 28, 2014 - 5:44 pm

[…] When your ready to eat, spoon into oven safe dishes and add some good quality toasted bread and cover with cheese and broil until golden and bubbly. My new favourite adaptation is to make croutons and put that on top rather than one piece of bread as it gets too hard to eat. Click here for my croutons. […]

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